As an architecture student, I don’t read many school-related books, none actually. But that doesn’t mean I don’t have any architecture related books on my shelves. Other than the random little books like How to architect here are the ones I’ve acquired over the years.

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Studio books

The first group of books are studio books. These are books from one architectural studio or company showcasing their own work. More or less coffee table books if you will.
The Cebra and Sleth books I’ve gotten from the companies themselves. The Olafur Eliasson book was a birthday gift from a couple of years ago.
These books aren’t academic books but more some I use for inspiration.

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Aarhus

These two books are Aarhus specific. Again they are not academic and I use them mostly to flip through.

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Architectural Atlas

A History of Western Architecture was one of the few books we have been required to buy for school. As the name suggests it is a history book and it covers western architecture from the byzantine time to modernism.
The other book is an atlas of new architecture. I got this one long before I started studying architecture.
Both of these books I use as reference work.

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Academic books

These three are what I would call academic books. They all describe different approaches and theories within architecture. The middle one is another that we were required to buy and read as part of my bachelor’s degree.

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The Others

These are probably my favorite architecture books. None of them are written by architects but they all in some way, shape, or form deal with architecture. Invisible Cities by Calvino is a classic example of this. For anyone who is interested in our build and designed environment I really recommend Happy City and The World Without Us. Both are easy reads that don’t really cover theories (although Happy City does reference some theory you can look up if that’s your fancy) and architecture history but deals more with the experience of our designed world from a contemporary standpoint.